Sunday, 13 January 2019

Bangabandhu-1 Satellite will Soon add New TV Channels of Bangladesh

Bangladesh satellite news: Local TV channels using the Bangabandhu-1 satellite. In Bangladesh, seven private and three state broadcasters broadcast programs with Bangabandhu-1, the country's first communications satellite.

The broadcasters are BTV World, Sangsad Bangladesh Television and BTV Chattogram and the private channels Somoy TV, DBC News, Independent TV, NTV, Ekattor TV, Bijoy TV and Boishaki TV. Betar, of the Government of Bangladesh, also uses the satellite.

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Bangladesh satellite news


The broadcasters are currently using the Bangabandhu satellite for free and will pay for this service from March next year. Currently they have contracts with the Apstar satellite. The termination must be made three months in advance.

"We will start winning next month," said Shahjahan Mahmood, president of the Bangladesh Communication Satellite Company (BCSCL).

In September, BTV reported live on the satellite championship of the South Asian Football Association. Some TV stations have also conducted transmission tests.

Each television station in Bangladesh uses a bandwidth of four to six megahertz and averages $ 20,000 per month for satellite connectivity. If everyone accepts the Bangabandhu 1 service, you can earn $ 10 million a year with the BCSCL. This is enough to make your business profitable.

Currently 34 Bangladeshi TV channels spend US $ 14 million a year on satellite from other countries.

"The TV channels range between $ 4,000 and $ 4,000 and we will offer them a better price with attractive discounts for additional bandwidth usage," said Mahmood. According to the original plan Bangabandhu-1 could reach break-even in seven years. But Mahmood said it could be done before.

Mahmood said that TV stations have incurred costs for managing their uplink and downlink. With BCSCL, new broadcasters can operate the service from a single point, saving TK $ 5 billion.

15 other television stations are ready to begin commercial activities in the country.

The satellite was launched in May this year as part of a project costing 2,765.66 million rupees. Bangladesh was able to enter the elite space club of 57 countries satellites in orbit.

The BCSCL has also signed an agreement with the country's first RealVU homestreaming service company to test programs broadcast on 48 local and international channels via Bangabandhu-1.

"We are about to enter into agreements with some companies in the Philippines and in countries where our satellite is very present," Mahmood said.

He said BCSCL's international advisor, Thaicom, a well-known satellite company in Thailand, which currently operates in some 20 countries, is working hard and new activities will soon be on the table.

"The formulation of the satellite company's management process poses many challenges, as it is a very new kind of technology and business to us, and it took a long time to get the satellite key."

On November 9, BCSCL took control of the satellite of its maker Thales Alenia Space.

To help the company function properly and make decisions faster, the government has formed a high-level committee chaired by the chief secretary of the prime minister's office.

The committee is composed of five senior secretaries, the Chairman of the Telecommunications Regulatory Commission in Bangladesh (BTRC) and the President of BCSCL.

In addition, the Telecommunications Regulatory Authority has already forced the new television channels to use the bandwidth of the national satellite to ensure optimum use of Bangabandhu-1's capacity.

"If the BCSCL does not provide the bandwidth it needs, it can use the services of other satellites," said Jahurul Haque, acting president of the BTRC.

The BCSCL has signed interim arrangements with some government agencies and will enter into agreements with two VSAT companies to provide uninterrupted banking connectivity.

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